Birding Hawaii


BIRDS, BIRDWATCHING AND WILDLIFE IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

WHICH BIRDS TO LOOK FOR AND WHERE LATEST BIRD SIGHTINGS NEWS AND EVENTS IN THE PACIFIC ARTICLES ON HAWAI'I & THE PACIFIC CONTACTS AND ADDRESSES IN HAWAI'I PHOTOGRAPHS MUCH, MUCH MORE.....





©Birding Hawaii 2006


Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds: Hawai'i comprises 132 islands, reefs and shoals and stretches 1,523 miles across the Pacific Ocean in a Southeast to Northwest chain which crosses the Tropic of Cancer between 154'40' and 178'25' W longitude and 18'54' to 28'15' N latitude and is the southern-most state in the United States of America. There are eight main islands which make up over 99% of the total land area of 6,425 square miles; these are Ni'ihau, Kaua'i, O'ahu, Moloka'i, Lana'i, Kaho'olawe, Maui and Hawai'i running from West to East through the chain.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsHawai'i is 2,400 miles from The Marquesas in the South, 2,390 miles from California in the East and 3,850 miles from Japan in the West, thus making Hawai'i the most isolated archipelago in the World.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsThe main geological features of Hawai'i are the result of volcanic activity and subsequent erosion. Remnant volcanoes, cinder cones and tuffs form massive and impressive structures, such as Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawai'i which are the peaks of the highest mountains in the islands and stand over 13,700 feet high from sea level (and about 10 kilometres above the floor of the Hawaiian Deep to the Northeast). Cinder cones can be over 200 metres high and tuffs can be over 250 metres high, whilst sea cliffs on Kaua'i and Moloka'i range from 600 to 1,100 metres at their highest. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
Constant erosion by the sea and wind and rain over millions of years has contributed to the spectacular landforms on the islands. Heavy rainfall has accentuated the huge river valleys and steep sided ravines that occur in the mainly volcanic rock. Wave action and flooding have worn down sea facing areas that has resulted in most islands having at least some flat coastal features; such as beaches, flood plains, marshes and alluvial plains. Small fringes of Sedimentary rock also occur around the edges of some of the islands.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsMuch of the land area of the main islands is steep, treacherous, heavily forested and difficult to inhabit. Due to this, most low-lying areas have been drained and developed for many reasons that include habitation and agriculture. The first Polynesian settlers had quickly cleared the low portions of the islands to grow crops and to provide shelter and fuel, and once the lower areas had been cleared, upland areas were also cleared and the face of Hawai'i's landscape was changed forever. Later settlers continued this practice and added to the destruction of habitat by draining low level, wet areas. Athens (in Kirch & Hunt ed. 1997) states that by the time Captain Cook arrived in 1778, the native lowland forest was absolutely gone, having been cleared mostly prior to A.D.1400 and probably as early as A.D.1000.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsAs the islands are the most isolated in the world only a limited number of species of birds were able to reach Hawai'i. Many of the species which arrived eventually evolved into endemic species and a total of 106 species and subspecies endemic to Hawai'i have been described so far (Olson and James 1991). Before the arrival of Captain Cook, 35 of these species had already become extinct, and since then a further 23 have joined them in extinction.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsThe introduction of alien plant and animal species, combined with the landscape alterations, ensured that Hawai'i would never be the same as it was when the first Polynesians arrived in about A.D. 800. Introduction of alien species was rapidly accelerated once the islands were discovered by Europeans, starting with Captain Cook on January 18th 1778. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Introduced disease, competition, predators and habitat destruction have unfortunately ensured that many of Hawai'i's unique species will never be seen again, however there are still many endemic bird species that can be seen throughout the Islands, and there is the hope that somewhere, on an inaccessible far flung mountainside, some of the species feared to have disappeared forever, are clinging on to existence.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds


Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Today's birdwatcher in Hawai'i luckily still has a wide variety of species to observe, whether it be through the pioneering and persevering nature of the native bird species or through the widespread introduction of exotic species by man. Birds in Hawai'i can be found in every available habitat, from mountain-top to sandy beach and wet upper elevation forest to dry, barren desert-like plains. Most birds in the Islands can be observed with a little time and patience, and on the whole most species are fairly easily accessible, with only the rarest of the rare being out of reach to most people.Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Twenty-two species of marine birds regularly nest in the Hawaiian Islands and many more pass through on migration to and from their breeding grounds elsewhere in the Pacific. The Islands are blessed with two breeding Albatross species, five Petrel or Storm-Petrel species, including one endemic (Hawaiian Petrel), three Shearwater species (including the endemic Newell's Shearwater), two Tropicbirds, three Booby species, a Frigatebird (Great Frigatebird, although Lesser has also nested), three Tern species and three Noddy species, and many of these species can be observed in and around the Main Hawaiian Islands. Migrant and vagrant seabirds that do not nest in the archipelago range from Albatross to Terns and have included one Albatross, eleven Petrels, three Storm-Petrels, six Shearwaters, one Tropicbird, eleven Terns, two Auklets and two Puffins. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i's dwindling wetlands are home to only a few resident indigenous species or sub-species which belong to well-distributed and widespread families; Black-crowned Night Heron, Hawaiian Black-necked Stilt, Hawaiian Coot, Hawaiian Moorhen, Hawaiian Duck, Laysan Duck and Nene or Hawaiian Goose, and the introduced Cattle Egret is seen widely throughout the Islands. These resident species are joined, particularly during the Fall and winter, but also in Spring, by migrant waterfowl and shorebirds from North America and Asia and species recorded range from the annually occurring Lesser Scaup and Pectoral Sandpiper to extreme vagrants such as Goldeneye and Black-tailed Godwit. Even Loons (Divers) and Grebes have been recorded from the Islands as vagrants, although the Pied-billed Grebe occurs fairly regularly and has even nested successfully on the Big Island of Hawai'i. Vagrant Herons, Egrets and Ibis are recorded occasionally and may be encountered in any suitable wetland area. In all more than forty species of waterfowl and fifty species of shorebird have been recorded from the Hawaiian archipelago - not bad for an island-chain more than two-thousand miles from the nearest landmass. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Many visitors to Hawai'i remark on the lack of Gulls around the beaches and harbours of the Islands. There are no indigenous or endemic gull species that nest in the Hawaiian Islands, although recent fossil evidence suggests that a gull species may have inhabited the Islands once. Gulls are generally continental species which inhabit the shallow waters along the edges of the continental shelf of mainland areas, and as such their food preferences are reflected in the areas they usually inhabit. However, several gull species do visit the Islands each year, the most frequently occurring species are Ring-billed Gull and Laughing Gull, but a further thirteen or so species have also been recorded. A large proportion of the gulls that arrive in Hawai'i never make it back to the mainland. Four species of Jaeger or Skua have also been recorded from waters around Hawai'i, although only the Pomarine Jaeger is regularly reported. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Four species of endemic bird are currently found only in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands, out of bounds to all except researchers and include the Laysan Duck, Laysan Finch, Nihoa Finch and the Nihoa Millerbird. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds In the Main Hawaiian Islands endemic forest birds survive on a knife-edge and are generally restricted to the high-elevation forest at altitudes where it is too cold for malaria-carrying mosquitoes to survive, however some endemic species appear to be becoming tolerant to the avian malaria and can be found at slightly lower elevations, more worrying however is the increased resistance shown by the mosquitoes, which are slowly creeping up the mountainsides and making the "safe" upland areas smaller and smaller in size. The Hawaiian Hawk or 'Io is found at most elevations on the Big Island and is usually the only raptor species present in the Islands (other than the indigenous Pueo or Short-eared Owl), although a few migrant species do occur occasionally. Just one Crow species survives in the Islands today, the 'Alala or Hawaiian Crow is extremely endangered and numbers very few birds. The population is old and the genetic pool small and it appears unlikely that the population is sustainable. Other endemic forest birds include the 'Elepaio, a monarch Flycatcher endemic to the Islands; the Hawaiian Thrushes which were related to the Solitaires of North America of which only the Puaiohi and 'Omao survive in Hawai'i, and the Hawaiian Honeycreepers and Finches which are probably the most celebrated group of birds in Hawai'i. The Hawaiian Honeycreepers and Finches (subfamily Drepanidinae) derived from the same species as the cardueline finches. A long time ago a finch-like species colonized the Hawaiian Islands and through adaptation and by utilizing all the available habitat evolved into a wide variety of different species, all of which were unique to Hawai'i and many of which were unique to each island in the archipelago. Today many have disappeared but the following species still survive in varying numbers in Hawai'i's forests: Palila, 'Akepa, 'Akekee, 'Anianiau, 'Amakihi, 'Akiapola'au, 'Akikiki, Hawai'i Creeper, Maui 'Alauahio, Maui Parrotbill, Po'o-uli, 'Apapane, 'I'iwi, 'Akohekohe, as well as the previously listed Nihoa and Laysan Finches. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Unfortunately the endemic Honeyeaters of the Hawaiian Islands, which fed (partly) on nectar collected with a four-branched, brush-tipped tongue - Kioea, Kaua'i O'o, Bishop's O'o, O'ahu O'o and Hawai'i O'o have all disappeared from the Islands' avifauna never to be seen again, the Kioea and O'ahu O'o had already disappeared by the end of the 1800's but the Kaua'i O'o managed to survive into the 1980's in Kaua'is Alaka'i Swamp. The passing of this unique and treasured species may at least produce one good thing, the understanding of the urgency of the plight of Hawai'i's endemic forest birds to all who come to the Islands to observe all forms of nature, not just birds, and heighten the awareness of the need for drastic and immediate action. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Introduced birds in Hawai'i's many and varied habitats are almost as varied in themselves with fifty-three species currently established (other previously established species have died out) and range from the large gamebirds such as Wild Turkey, Common Peafowl, California Quail and Black Francolin to the small forest birds such as White-rumped Shama, Japanese Whiteeye, Hwamei and Red-billed Leiothrix and the introduced seed-eaters such as House Sparrow, Common Waxbill and Yellow-faced Grassquit. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Wherever you are in the Hawaiian Islands there are likely to be birds visible and it is hoped that this site will at least partly help the visiting birder, naturalist or regular tourist to have a better understanding and appreciation of the species they see around them, as well as providing an information tool to help them find and observe those species that call Hawai'i their home. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsBirding in Hawai'i is fairly straightforward, although the steep mountains, treacherous ravines and deep sided gullies render much of the Islands inaccessible. Also much of the land of the Islands is privately owned or is under management by the State, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Nature Conservancy or are included in other natural parks and conservation areas. Hopefully the information found on this site will help to provide some guidance for finding birds in Hawai'i, although this will ultimately depend on the commitment of the birder and, of course, the cooperation of the birds! Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
Many major airlines fly to Hawai'i and as schedules and prices change constantly information is not included on getting to Hawai'i, a local travel agent or other web sites can provide the necessary information. Interisland flights can easily be booked on or off island and are relatively inexpensive. All the major airports have car rental desks, and for birding in Hawai'i the renting of a car is almost essential, as most birding sites are off major highways, and apart from O'ahu, public transport is unlikely to get to the areas that most birders would want to go to find birds. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Information on the basics of a trip to Hawai'i, such as accommodation, car hire, flights, places to go etc. can be obtained from the Hawai'i Visitors Bureau, details of which can be found on the page, and again are not dealt with on this site. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Not every day in Hawai'i is clear blue skies and sunshine. Although many sites are near enough to parking areas or "civilization" for easy access to cover or shade, remote areas, especially at the tops of mountains may be many miles from the nearest service or emergency area. Weather in the Islands can be notoriously changeable - with bright sunshine one minute and torrential rain and flash floods the next. Always try to check the weather forecast before going to remote areas. If hiking in areas away from the main routes it is best to carry some form of rain gear. It is also important to remember that these often "high altitude" areas can be considerably cooler than the coastal areas, especially early morning and at night. If staying overnight in these areas, whether camping or in a cabin, it is a good idea to bring some warm layers. The sunrise at Haleakala, a popular destination for many visitors, can be bitingly cold with temperatures near freezing. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
Of course, as well as being colder at these altitudes, it is also closer to the sun and therefore a good sunblock is recommended, even if the day is not bright sunshine with no cloud, it is still possible to get sunburnt, sunstroke or be over exposed to ultra-violet light. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hiking along "dry" stream beds should be undertaken with caution, especially after or during rain. Flash flooding can occur, with a dry river bed becoming a raging torrent in a few minutes. Be prepared. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds As well as the previously mentioned change in temperature, the high altitude can bring on altitude sickness or shortness of breath in some people, especially when walking or hiking for prolonged periods. Haleakala, Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, the three highest peaks in the State are particular places where this can happen. The best solution is to try to avoid over-exertion by taking regular breaks and to slow the pace a little. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Bottled water should always be carried when walking, even in areas that are not that remote, as dehydration can quickly set in. On average a person should drink 3 litres of water a day, and this should be increased if in very hot areas or if added excertion, such as hiking, has been performed.
Unfortunately the water in Hawai'i's streams and rivers, even near the source, is not suitable for drinking as it may have been contaminated by introduced animals such as Pigs and Rats. Some people who do drink the water are unaffected, while others become ill or contract diseases, some seriously with kidney and liver problems.
Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Luckily there are no animals that are likely to cause many worries to the average visitor. Pigs and Goats that live wild on some of the islands are likely to have disappeared by the time one gets to the spot where they were, but occasionally an individual will stay rooted to the spot, in most cases the contact will be short-lived, but occasionally attacks have occurred, particularly from females with young. The best course of action is to leave them alone and try not to alarm the animal, it is unlikely it will attack unless provoked, and in most cases will soon run off into the undergrowth. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Mongoose, present on all the main Islands except Kauai, can be quite viscious, but are unlikely to allow close approach by humans. Any sighting of Mongoose on Kaua'i should be immediately reported, as this species poses the greatest threat to native birds. If Mongoose ever get to Kaua'i it will be a disaster, and perhaps the final nail in the coffin for some species. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
There are no native land snakes in Hawai'i and so any sighting should be reported. Most reports concern escaped pets which are soon recaptured, or die as they find it hard to survive for long, however the Brown Tree Snake has decimated populations of birds on other Pacific Islands and would be an incredibly unwelcome guest to the Hawaiian Islands fauna. it is unlikely that a bite from a Brown Tree Snake would cause any long term effects, but a trip to the emergency room would be advised to make sure. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds There are hundreds of species of insects in Hawai'i (mostly introduced) and nearly all of them are harmless. There are however Wasps, Bees and Centipedes which can give a painful sting or bite. These are unlikely to be a problem unless the victim has an allergic reaction, in which case they should be taken to hospital. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
Black Widow Spiders and scorpions also occur on the Islands and if bitten or stung the victim should be taken to a doctor as quickly as possible. Usually these species remain unnoticed and are seldom seen by visitors. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Mosquitoes and other "little annoyances" are really just that and are unlikely to cause any long-term problems. Mosquitoes in Hawai'i do not transmit Malaria which would affect humans. All insect bites can usually be treated with an antiseptic cream. Of course a bug repellent spray or similar will hopefully keep most bugs at bay. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds As anywhere, a pair of binoculars is essential for seeing birds in Hawai'i, and it is unlikely that any birder would travel without them, but it has been known! A telescope and tripod are recommended and are sometimes essential for certain sites, such as Hanalei or some of the reservoirs where birds may be a great distance off. A telescope is also essential for watching birds at sea. Although many seabirds can be seen from land with just binoculars, many species pass by further out, beyond the range of most binoculars. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
There are many useful books to help the visitor in Hawai'i and these are easily found on the Internet, in bookstores and in libraries. For the birder, two of the most useful are "A Fieldguide to the Birds of Hawai'i and the Tropical Pacific" by H.D.Pratt et al. and "Enjoying Birds and other Wildlife in Hawai'i" by H.D. Pratt. The latter is a great site guide which will guide birders to most of the species in Hawai'i. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds All the sites mentioned in the text of the web site are locations where there is access to members of the public, whether all year round, unlimited, or by appointment only. No sites have been included where there is no public access or where trespassing would be the only way of entering the site. If visitors wish to enter "unauthorized" sites they should either try and arrange access or face the consequences, if any, of entering private land. Directions to sites covered can be found on the page. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Ni'ihau and Kaho'olawe are both out of bounds to tourists and visitors at present. Ni'ihau, just west of Kaua'i is a private island owned by the Robinson family and only native Hawaiians are usually allowed onto the property. In recent years hunting trips have been available which allow access to strictly controlled areas, but these trips are very expensive and unlikely to be of much interest to visiting birdwatchers. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Kaho'olawe has been used as target practice by the U.S. government for many years and has many unexploded bombs and live ammunition scattered across it and is thus out of bounds to visitors. Recent efforts have begun to clear the island of ammunitions and to hopefully allow some sort of access to the site, however as all native forest has been removed and no endemic bird species exist here anymore, it is of minimal interest to birdwatchers. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Please take special care not to trespass onto conservation areas or wildlife refuges as this may affect feeding and nesting to the birds there. On Fish and Wildlife land trespassing may also result in being cited and fined. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Military and Marine Bases are of course very sensitive areas and most of these sites have a no access policy. A few have restricted access and these are highlighted in the . Please adhere to all posted signs or verbal instructions at these locations to avoid being detained or causing unwarranted trouble to the sites involved. Kaneohe Marine Corps Base on O'ahu, for example, has a strict visitation policy and those arriving without a prior confirmed appointment will not be allowed access. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds
Camping and some other activities are regulated and may require permits, for these it is again recommended that the Hawai'i Visitors Bureau is contacted, as they will be able to provide up-to-date requirements and information on nearly all visitor needs, including permit information. The HVB telephone numbers can be found on the Page. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds As an American State the primary language is American-English, but a wide variety of other languages are spoken reflecting the diversity of inhabitants of this international destination. Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Thai, Korean, French and many other languages may be heard, especially on O'ahu. Hawaiian is still spoken by a few residents and is once again gaining in popularity as a symbol of independence. Most street names and locations are named in Hawaiian and it is a good idea to familiarize oneself with some of the more common terms, and there are many books which deal with the Hawaiian language. Two phrases which are often used, and can be useful when birding are Mauka - towards the mountains and Makai -towards the ocean. Aloha (Hello, Good-bye, with Love) and Mahalo (Thank-you) are also used in everyday conversation. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, BirdsHawai'i State nickname - The Aloha State Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Bird - Nene or Hawaiian Goose Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Flower - Pua Aloalo or Hibiscus (photo right) Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Tree - Kukui or Candlenut tree Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Marine Mammal - Humpback Whale Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Fish - Humu'humu'nuku'nuku'apu'a'a or Rectangular Trigger Fish Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Motto: Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono - "The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness" Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Song: Hawai'i Ponoi - written by King Kalakaua Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Flag: Designed for King Kamehameha I prior to 1916, it has the UK's Union Jack in the upper left-hand corner. Eight stripes of red, white and blue represent the eight largest islands. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds

Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds Hawai'i State Seal: The state seal incorporates the state motto and a heraldic shield flanked by King Kamehameha I on one side and the Goddess of Liberty holding the Hawaiian flag on the other. It also has taro and banana leaves, ferns, a phoenix and the statehood year of 1959. Birding Hawai'i and Birds, Birdwatching, Hawai'i, Hawaii, Birds, Birders, Hawai'i, Birds, Hawai'i, Birds